The online racing simulator
September Progress Report
(136 posts, closed, started )
You right. I have no sounds too.
Quote from TROLDMANDEN :
will all sounds have to be remade ?
im thinking about engine sounds mainly from current version to new.
but also other sounds (sound folder)?

Already answered in this post from Scawen:
https://www.lfs.net/forum/post/1947381#post1947381

Short: Nope, not in the this update

Did i misunderstand your question? Do you mean because of the new environments or new materials?
Will this affect the game requirements a lot? , maybe we need a more powerful pc to run it. because in fact I have a low performance pc
This is my first post in about 15 years. Team, just wanted to say thanks for all your amazing work since the LFS project ever began, LFS is responsible for getting me into sim racing and remains to this day a cherished point in time. Brilliant job, all of you.
Scawen, Eric, and Victor. You have all made an incredible product and I'm very excited to see what the future holds for LFS. The new SO is absolutely beautiful and the new HDR effects are very impressive.

One day, 20, 30 years from now, I do hope you considering opening the source code for all of this. This code base is a shrine to what a small team of dedicated professionals can do. Outstanding work!
Quote from Dygear :Scawen, Eric, and Victor. You have all made an incredible product and I'm very excited to see what the future holds for LFS. The new SO is absolutely beautiful and the new HDR effects are very impressive.

One day, 20, 30 years from now, I do hope you considering opening the source code for all of this. This code base is a shrine to what a small team of dedicated professionals can do. Outstanding work!

ROFL One day, 20, 30 years from now, they might get this game finished.
Quote from Racer Y :ROFL One day, 20, 30 years from now, they might get this game finished.

This game will never be finished, they will just stop working on it someday, there is always something to improve.
Quote from Dannyleelee :This is my first post in about 15 years. Team, just wanted to say thanks for all your amazing work since the LFS project ever began, LFS is responsible for getting me into sim racing and remains to this day a cherished point in time. Brilliant job, all of you.

Its always good to see some of the long time LFS racers remain appreciative of the gem that LFS is. It goes beyond the racing also due to the friendships made with people internationally who end up becoming some of the best people you could know

All the best

bish Smile
Cruise simulator
That looks amazing. Cannot wait!
Thanks for the update.
It looks simply fantastic and I can't wait to see the updated environments and physics, hopefully within a reasonable timeframe!
Quote from Dannyleelee :This is my first post in about 15 years. Team, just wanted to say thanks for all your amazing work since the LFS project ever began, LFS is responsible for getting me into sim racing and remains to this day a cherished point in time. Brilliant job, all of you.

+1 on this sentiment... I'm sure there are plenty of us lurkers who pop in from time to time. When my kids want to play on the 'driving VR' they want LFS. It's much more accessible to go and hot-lap, and the first game I've managed to get them to learn the brake pedal. My 9yo has even been practicing a bit without auto-clutch, it is becoming inter-generational!

I look forward to when these improvements come through, perhaps consider polling your audience with some ideas on bringing this to GA? Personally I would be happy to pay for offline Open Beta access and test for example. Whilst I much appreciate not being fleeced for additional creative like the mainstream, and recognise you don't want to be driven by consumer demands, if it helps fund ongoing development to ensure continuity then please, monetise us Smile

It doesn't make sense to merge with public release if there is additional overhead, you're already constrained on time, so you should just make us wait - but could be a 'best of both' approach?
Quote from Ross Burton :It doesn't make sense to merge with public release if there is additional overhead, you're already constrained on time, so you should just make us wait - but could be a 'best of both' approach?

Yeah, I'd be happy to pay more for beta access. I'm already paying for beta access to some hardware that I can't really talk about, so doing it here for something that has made me a better programmer would be a nice way to give back.
i was testing the Oculus Rift (bad HMD with extremely bad resolution, but it works) and have to say: The stereoscopic Mirrors are amazing. It run not smooth because of 100 Hz Tickrate, but Head Moving is smooth and for example ETS2 (bad physics) have Mono-Mirrors. Please keep this.

But until the HMDs having Freesync is it maybe not relevant.

A good sim (not a arcade sim) like LFS can maybe not having a Frame-Rate which is not influenced by the tick rate, this works maybe only with arcade like simulators.
HMD with free sync would be nauseating.
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(karamurat1004) DELETED by Scawen : crack user
Applying more throttle in a rear wheel drive car does induce understeer as load lifts off the front, resulting in a wider line, unless it’s enough power to exceed traction and induce wheel spin at the rear.

Assuming the car is settled into a turn and a transient spike of power hits the rear wheels without time for the load to transfer rearwards, resulting in some level of wheel spin; does that induce a wider line and understeer on current LFS tyres?

Or have I misread and/or misunderstood the comments on the current tyre anomalies?
I took Scawen's comment to mean a wider line in general, rather than the car specifically oversteering or understeering. Even oversteer will cause a wider line if enough grip (both lateral and longitudinal) goes away from the rear tires, as there'd simply be less force keeping you on a tighter line then.
We'll have to wait for the finished physics to know for certain, but I'm assuming combined-slip behavior now maintains more overall grip when accelerating hard out of a turn, rotation can happen with less sliding, and the car's torque can push it into a tighter line than before.
I don't have time to get into tyre physics at the moment but had some thoughts on it after Eeekie's post.

I think there are some competing effects when the throttle is applied.

1) As Eeekie described, the rear wheels become more loaded, lengthening the contact patch and so requiring less slip angle for a given lateral force. And conversely the front wheels become less loaded, get a shorter contact patch and require more slip angle for a given lateral force. From this point of view the car might take a wider line without any steering adjustment.

2) But there is another effect and that is that a wheel which has a longitudinal force applied, will produce less lateral force for a given slip angle. So from this point of view, a rear wheel drive car with more throttle applied (and no change in steering input) will follow a tighter line because the rear wheels will require a wider slip angle for a given force.

3) There are also other possible competing effects, such as the change in toe and camber due to suspension deflection, and the effect of a limited slip differential.

Now, I definitely may be wrong but I imagine number (2) above to be the dominant effect. I think that is how it is in my car but it would be hard to test unless I can find a skid pad. It may well be that a different effect is dominant in different cars, due to the different mass distributions and other design features. As I apply the throttle there is a whole range of slip angles before the point when the whole contact patch is skidding. Now I'm really not a crazy driver at all these days and don't drive much anyway but there are times when I can accelerate pretty hard out of a roundabout without any danger to myself or others. I can apply a lot of power without actually going sideways and it feels to me like it gets closer to oversteer through that process. It feels very planted and poised as I apply more power. A good part of my mind is focussed on the rear wheels, remembering I used to be a motorcyclist and am very aware of going over the limit. It's a feeling of confidence though and there is a certain joy to it. I believe I get this same feeling in the new physics of LFS, but in the old LFS there are some slight changes of line that don't seem to correspond with reality.
I appreciate the time you’ve taken to describe some of the effects at play here, it’s really interesting, and it’s clearly a far more complex problem than it seems on the surface, but I also understand this isn’t the time to get too deep into it, so I’m not expecting this to spark any debate or warrant more response when there are better things to be getting on with.

I think there are competing things happening when you accelerate in a rear drive car, and the balance of what wins might depend somewhat on the car itself, as well as any fancy electronics potentially stepping in.

My analog RX-7 has wider tyres at the rear than at the front, and quite a linear and gentle power curve, so unless you’re extremely aggressive the load transfer plays a more dominant role in pushing the car out wide.
Which would be a combination of bigger contact patch mentioned here and more force pressing down on the tyre into the road surface.

The same goes for our MX-5 which has a more modest engine, but also equal width tyres front and rear. More power increases acceleration which sends more grip rearward compared to the front—which if at the limit mid-corner means a wider line. I guess an increase in speed in general also dictates a wider line if you were already at the limit, too.

Both of these cars have been used on track days and also at the AutoSolo events that used to be held in Rockingham’s car park. Applying the throttle on either car only induced more front end lift and understeer, as described in Skip Barber’s Going Faster book as what happens with “light throttle” in the context of a racing car. Neither of my cars has the combination of engine power, power delivery, suspension, tyres etc to really break away or even decrease turning radius at the rear under throttle in the dry unless you really unload the rear first. You move the grip front or rearward with your feet, and the car’s ability to change direction adjusts accordingly.

I also had a tuned Polo G40 at one point with a clutch-pack LSD out of one of the 90’s G40 Cup cars. Horrendously aggressive and chassis splitting. But that front-wheel drive car would actually decrease in turn radius as you applied power, and wash out wide as you lifted off, which I can’t make any sense of when I look back at it. Maybe it was some weird torque steer effect turning the actual steering geometry into the corner more. I had that car before I had LFS or any track experience so I doubt I was really at the limit, despite how terrifying it was.

I’d love it if the WIP tyre physics could be toggled on/off in a single player environment so we could give them a go. What’s being described—that feeling—likely really is bang on in that island take off circumstance and it’s just hard to put into words, but we’d all just recognise that feeling and agree it’s a step in the right direction.
Either way, look forward to seeing what you come up with on that side of things when you’re happy enough with them.
Quote :I also had a tuned Polo G40 at one point with a clutch-pack LSD out of one of the 90’s G40 Cup cars. Horrendously aggressive and chassis splitting. But that front-wheel drive car would actually decrease in turn radius as you applied power, and wash out wide as you lifted off, which I can’t make any sense of when I look back at it.

The more a differential locks on power, the harder the outside wheel will push compared to the inside when turning and accelerating at the same time. Much the same applies for locking on coast.
So on power, the outside of the car tries to overtake the inside and you get more rotation. The reverse happens for coasting and you get less rotation. The current LFS physics already recreate this in a more exaggerated form: just throw a locked diff on any of the FWDs in the game.
Quote from matze54564 :i was testing the Oculus Rift (bad HMD with extremely bad resolution, but it works) and have to say: The stereoscopic Mirrors are amazing. It run not smooth because of 100 Hz Tickrate, but Head Moving is smooth and for example ETS2 (bad physics) have Mono-Mirrors. Please keep this.

But until the HMDs having Freesync is it maybe not relevant.

A good sim (not a arcade sim) like LFS can maybe not having a Frame-Rate which is not influenced by the tick rate, this works maybe only with arcade like simulators.

Which version of Oculus? I started with the DK1 (really really bad resolution) then the DK2(not too bad if increased the pixel per display pixel in the debug tool) and now onto the Rift S which looks great
Nice progress, do we have any idea when graphic update might come available?
Quote from kopsu93 :Nice progress, do we have any idea when graphic update might come available?

No one really knows.
I would say around December 2021... but who knows.
2023
This thread is closed

September Progress Report
(136 posts, closed, started )
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