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Oculus Rift Consumer Version officially announced for Q1 2016
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Oculus Rift Consumer Version officially announced for Q1 2016
Just read it (elsewhere) yeah. This gives Scawen the time to redesign LFS cpu usability for at least seven more months.. Maybe 8 months.

Will it be enough? Hopefully Wink
Q1 2016 was my guess, but I'm more curious about technical specs and there are none so far.
Blog post: https://www.oculus.com/blog/powering-the-rift/

Quote :On the raw rendering costs: a traditional 1080p game at 60Hz requires 124 million shaded pixels per second. In contrast, the Rift runs at 2160×1200 at 90Hz split over dual displays, consuming 233 million pixels per second. At the default eye-target scale, the Rift’s rendering requirements go much higher: around 400 million shaded pixels per second. This means that by raw rendering costs alone, a VR game will require approximately 3x the GPU power of 1080p rendering.

So CV1 will have the exact same resolution and refresh rate as HTC Vive. That's rather disapointing, I was expecting the resolution to be as good as Gear VR (2560x1440) or better.

It will be hard to choose between Vive and Rift Confused
#6 - troy
Right now I'd say it's easy, with lighthouse and the controllers Vive for me is the better package. Oculus has been quiet with input though, maybe they manage to wow us when E3 gets going. Smile
Quote :
Oculus Rift Hardware Requirements Revealed - Linux and OS X development «paused», no timeline for restarting work

Our development for OS X and Linux has been paused in order to focus on delivering a high quality consumer-level VR experience at launch across hardware, software, and content on Windows. We want to get back to development for OS X and Linux but we don’t have a timeline.

https://www.oculus.com/blog/powering-the-rift/

Quote :Funny how it went from a crowd funded project with cross-platform, open-source SDK, to a proprietary, closed-source SDK, then to a closed-sourced, non-cross-platform Facebook product.

From a russian linux forum.
This from Computerworld

"Graphics cards need to be equivalent to or more powerful than the AMD Radeon R9 290 or Nvidia GeForce GTX 970, while the processor needs to match or exceed an Intel i5-4590 chip, the virtual-reality headset maker said in a blog post. Systems need at least 8GB of RAM, two USB 3.0 ports and must be able to handle HDMI 1.3 video output. They also need to be running at least Windows 7 with Service Pack 1.

Having common specs will simplify the development process and allow programmers to create apps and games that offer a consistent experience, said Oculus chief architect Atman Binstock in a blog post. This is important, since hardware that isn't up to par will deliver a negative experience, he said."

"Laptop owners who hoped to use the Rift are out of luck, at least for now. Many laptops have external video outputs connected to an integrated GPU (graphic processing units), said Binstock said. However, in those scenarios the video output is handled by "hardware and software mechanisms that can't support the Rift," he added."

Well, that answers most questions !
A question for any Rift users who have installed the new SDK 0.6.0.0.

NOTE: I hear it's a bad release so please don't install to test this! But if you have already installed it...

I posted this on the Oculus forums: https://forums.oculus.com/viewtopic.php?f=42&t=15110&start=80#p273314

Quote :I have just read about the new SDK 0.6.0.0. Apparently it no longer supports client based distortion rendering.

I would just like to know if the current version of LFS (built with the older SDK) still works on your DK2 if you have installed 0.6.0.0.

Please do not install 0.6.0.0 as a test! I read that it is a bad release, full of bugs. I'm just asking those who have already installed it, if you could try LFS and let me know what happens.

Thanks.

This is not a dig, this is a sys admin/tech work related response, but I have come across stuff like this before so please just think about what I'm saying Smile Thank you for your co-operation.

Had a quick read through the SDK notes but, having read my post above regarding Occ Rift minimum system requirements, do you think that developing in XP may be part of the issue ?

Occ Rift have stated very high system requirements that your developement PC may or may not meet.

I would suggest ensuring that your developement PC meets or exceeds the minimum requirements for Occ Rifts stated system requirements.

Occ Rift have stated that their system requires "Graphics cards need to be equivalent to or more powerful than the AMD Radeon R9 290 or Nvidia GeForce GTX 970, while the processor needs to match or exceed an Intel i5-4590 chip. Systems need at least 8GB of RAM, two USB 3.0 ports and must be able to handle HDMI 1.3 video output. They also need to be running at least Windows 7 with Service Pack 1.

As I said to another client today, my opinion of the spec is irrelevant.
What is relevant are the stated specs !
As stated before, LFS does its own rendering therefore can have better optimization then the default routines so the specifications produced in the news can be a bit... Overrated. Think of it, two times 960x1080 @75 fps isn't also really that extreme. Actually it's exactly the same amount of pixels of a single HD monitor; 2073600 pixels.

// oops... old specs on their website... Already was thinking something is wrong Smile

Consumer Version: 2160x1200 (1080x1200 per eye)... Anyway thats 2592000 pixels. 25% higher then full HD. Still not very shocking.. The 90 Hz is a bit more tricky, your graphics card need to produce 90 FPS all the time basically. Or in case if you want to compare it with running full HD now 90x1,25 = 112,5 FPS.

No idea what they mean with "eye-target scale" in that quoted bit from Amynue, I guess the system internally needs a higher resolution to render the final images but like I said LFS does that on its own so the requirements can be different.
Quote from Racer X NZ :Had a quick read through the SDK notes but, having read my post above regarding Occ Rift minimum system requirements, do you think that developing in XP may be part of the issue ?

Occ Rift have stated very high system requirements that your developement PC may or may not meet.

I would suggest ensuring that your developement PC meets or exceeds the minimum requirements for Occ Rifts stated system requirements.

I'm not developing on XP now. I was forced onto Windows 7 when I started developing for the Rift DK2.

I'm sure I don't meet their minimum spec but that is not related to my question about the recent Oculus SDK update. I haven't tried it because I don't want to break everything but they state that they have disabled the features that LFS relies on (rendering direct to the Rift configured as a second monitor).

This is why I am asking if anyone has tried it, to see if they really have broken LFS on the DK2 as seems to be the case. Of course the Rift developers aren't replying to questions from application developers on their own 'developer' forum, as their standard method of communication is to put out random updates with bugs and refuse to reply to questions from developers.

Quote from cargame.nl :Consumer Version: 2160x1200 (1080x1200 per eye)... Anyway thats 2592000 pixels. 25% higher then full HD. Still not very shocking.. The 90 Hz is a bit more tricky, your graphics card need to produce 90 FPS all the time basically. Or in case if you want to compare it with running full HD now 90x1,25 = 112,5 FPS.

No idea what they mean with "eye-target scale" in that quoted bit from Amynue, I guess the system internally needs a higher resolution to render the final images but like I said LFS does that on its own so the requirements can be different.

We (and everyone else) render to a surface that has around 1.7 times the number of pixels. This is because the image is compressed more and more as you move away from the centre of the view. So to ensure a proper resolution in the centre of the distorted image, we must render the undistorted image at that higher resolution.
According to Farcebook;
The compositor service moves distortion rendering from the application process to the OVRServer process using texture sets that are shared between the two processes. A texture set is basically a swap chain, with buffers rotated to allow game rendering to proceed while the current frame is distorted and displayed.

Layer support allows multiple independent application render targets to be independently sent to the HMD. For example, you might render a heads-up display, background, and game space each in their own separate render target. Each render target is a layer, and the layers are combined by the compositor (rather than the application) right before distortion and display. Each layer may have a different size, resolution, and update rate.
The API simplification is a move towards the final API, which primarily removes support for application-based distortion rendering.

From my lesser knowledge of programming, but greater cynicism as a sys admin. I'm guessing you need an insane video card cus that's whats doing the grunt work.

There will be a reason for these insane specs that's not just Candy Crush related.

I suspect that LFS being popular and low spec upset 'some pile of money' so the specs were changed so 'some pile of money' could make more cash.

Check out the alternatives that aren't owned by a bunch of 'redacted'. A collection of 'redacted' pointless 'redacted' moneyhungry 'redacted', 'redacted', 'redacted', and 'redacted', 'redacted', up their 'redacted', 'redacted', 'redacted', corporations.

There are other systems that use opensource api's that, in my opinion, are better to support. Smile

"But HTC has a huge advantage over other VR headsets in its partnership with Valve - there's a massive amount of Steam games that already have the necessary code to work with the Oculus Rift, and Valve is releasing an open source API (application programming interface) so that developers can make their products (not just games) compatible with SteamVR." http://www.wareable.com/vr/htc-vive-vr-headset-release-date-price-specs-7929

Yes, Occ Rift looked awesome and was the first. Then Farcebook came and .......

Look at all the options rather than just one. The 3D concept is coming, just support the ones that fit with LFS. The min specs for Occ Rift are so far away from your stated vision for LFS it's not funny.
Wait a second, so they will render the ads directly as another additional layer (uncontrollable from application), am I reading you correctly? Whoa, that one will work in race sim like a charm... Big grin
Quote from Scawen :We (and everyone else) render to a surface that has around 1.7 times the number of pixels. This is because the image is compressed more and more as you move away from the centre of the view. So to ensure a proper resolution in the centre of the distorted image, we must render the undistorted image at that higher resolution.

Alright, thanks for this clarification. Hoped you found something clever to tackle this performance hit but apparently there is no solution to this then. x1.7 is really a big factor. Need to stay above 191.25 FPS all the time if you are on the commonly used full HD resolution. Still not really necessary to have a 970 concerning LFS .. With other games/sims and their GPU heavy techniques it's going to be tricky.
You'll have to drop graphic settings drasticly to get constant 90 fps on newer games @ higher resolution. 970 is just recommended so it's propably for med-high settings. Gonna need SLI for high-ultra.

Oculus Rift Consumer Version officially announced for Q1 2016
(16 posts, started )
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