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Technique and Setup Questions
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Technique and Setup Tutorial and Questions
Post your setup and technique questions here!

Here is a tutorial written by our very own Sam Aardema (Pronounced Some Ayrduhmuh, with the Ayr like Ayrton Senna), about how to maximize your drifting experience in S2.
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Okay, I already noticed it from the S2 demo that alot of people are putting drifting down because they think it has gotten too hard.

Yes, it has changed. Quite alot actually. I see most people in S2 trying to drift the cars as if it is S1. Obviously this does not work.

In S2 with the new steering lock, tire wear and increased traction, drifting seems alot harder.
More traction means having to put more effort to get the car sideways, a smaller steering lock means you have less ability to correct and recover errors, tire wear creates a need to drift 'economical' with tires.
Whereas in S1 you could just put the throttle down and drift all over the place. If you go a bit too far you still had 45° of steering lock so yeah, no problem drifting.

So it seems like drifting in S2 is alot harder and yes, it isn't motivating to be spinning out alot and I admit, I spun out alot in the beginning of S2.
But, what I would like to show you, is that drifting in S2 has become even better. Not is it just more realistic, it's much more fun!

All it takes is a little change from you and on the other side, a change of your car setups. The small steering lock has made it alot harder with stiff setups that most of us used in S1 and thus doing the same in S2. But if you give the car, first of all, a softer suspension with enough bodyroll, you will see that it is alot easier than you might've thought to maintain control with the small wheel lock.

I'm going to give you a small tutorial of how to setup your own car to drift in S2 this way:
Note: This is not the only way to set a car up to drift but it is a great way to get good control.

* First of all, one of the most important, the suspension. Give the car not much stiffness, not much bump damping, medium to high rebound damping and (almost) no anti-roll.

* When a car drifts you would want as much control as possible. During a drift, the weight shifts on one side, putting more stress on one side than the other. This way, normally your front wheels will not get an ideal contact patch with the ground, giving you less control, as your car is angled outside the corner.
To improve the contact patch during a drift, you need some negative camber on the front wheels, because this will give the wheels a slightly angled position. As your weight shifts through a drift, the car's angle makes the angled wheels get a horizontal position, so it gives you alot more control.
In short, give the front wheels a -1 to -3 camber, depending on the amount of bodyroll. (More bodyroll, more negative camber).

* Give the rear wheels a bit less traction by increasing the pressure, (possibly choosing ROAD_NORMAL tires instead of ROAD_SUPER) and/or giving it some camber. (Warning, too much camber on the rear wheels will wear the tires out real fast).

* Get the brakes to hold your drift while braking, not stabilising the car. To do this, simply set the brake balance(front) to around 50. Try and play with this setting and see what's best for the car and setup. To test it, start a drift and brake, if the car stays drifting without stabilising the car again, they are good.

Those are about the main things you need to do to set your car up.

My point is that it is alot easier with such settings. I can recover and correct much better this way instead of using the traditional setups most people use. These setups indeed make it hard to correct with the 36° steering lock. Before, I had alot of trouble and I often spun out. Now, I love drifting. I even think it is better than ever. We have more traction giving you more control over the car. The only problem would be the small steering lock but that can be ressolved by doing what I did.

For those that do not quite understand the tutorial you can try my soft XR GT Turbo setup, or my soft FZ50 setup.

If you don't like these setups, try my stiffer variants: Stiff XR GT Turbo setup and Stiff FZ50 setup.

Some quick tips:
Try and get a feel for the car, measure its limits and how far you can go over the limit when drifting. If you go too far, your car will spin out of control leaving you helpless. To avoid this from happening, try not to throw the cars into corners with full throttle and full lock. Only apply full throttle when initiating a drift if you know you can. Wise throttle control makes you drift much more controlled, as it doesnt really create unexpected spin-outs. Also, this spares your tires so you are able to drift longer. The more your tires get worn, the less throttle you should apply because your rear will slide much more easily and when it does there isnt much to control it left, so be easy on the throttle.

If you feel like the car is going to spin out, release the throttle quickly but gently and countersteer as much and quickly as you can.

If you do all the above correctly, you will see that you have significant more control than in the previous S1, because you have more grip now.

Here are some replays I made to show you how relatively easy it is to drift in S2 with my method.
XR GT Turbo on BL GP - Demo style!
FZ50 - South City Long Reversed - Awesome car on a classic track!
XR GT Turbo - Fern Bay Black Reversed - Couldnt be any more oldskool, the drifter's heaven in my favorite S1 car.

I really hope to see some more drifting in S2. There's a fair amount of people drifting in S2 but it's alot less compared to S1. Drifting being too hard is a lame excuse. Unless you're a sissy that cannot adapt just a bit. Grin

See you either sideways next to me or in my rear mirror! Cool

- Diesel
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#2 - (SaM)
just a quick tip from me on setups, i highly suggest using normals on the rear and front. Then set the front tires to a lower pressure and some negative camber. The higher pressure you make the fronts, add some more to the negative camber, but not too much. The rears should be a higher tire pressure, so that tires can last longer.

lol, quick tip of the day
Noy sure about you but I noticed that I can "drift" better with slightly tuned race set than with a hardcore drifting setup. Maybe it's the same thing as it is with the wr setups for racing - need more skill to use them efficiently
well, that is somewhat true to life, as the D1-Spec SE3P (RX-8 to all you other non-import heads) by JIC can actually be easily re-tuned at the track for time attack, and vice versa.
Quote from Hyperactive :Noy sure about you but I noticed that I can "drift" better with slightly tuned race set than with a hardcore drifting setup. Maybe it's the same thing as it is with the wr setups for racing - need more skill to use them efficiently

im not so sure why but for some reason most drift setups ive seen have rather high coast lock making them understeer at the corner entrance so you have to force them to oversteer and you might end up spinning if you overdo it
#7 - (SaM)
Most drift setups understeer a bit actually. A setup with too much front grip can feel a bit too sensitive. There's techniques where you use the understeer to control a car better. But then again, it's better to have more front grip than more understeer. You need the steering.
...and seem to be set up for bigger drifting angles, which may be too much for a starting drifter.
basically it's easier to create oversteer when understeering, rather than trying to create understeer when oversteering.

it's easier to take the toothpaste out of the tube than it is to put the toothpaste in the tube.
Quote from RevMonkey :basically it's easier to create oversteer when understeering, rather than trying to create understeer when oversteering.

it's easier to take the toothpaste out of the tube than it is to put the toothpaste in the tube.

Rev, that is the worst analogy I have ever heard
If I go into a corner wrong, or just messed up at some point or another, I usually will understeer throughout the whole turn, because if I try to initiate a drift mid turn, it usually leads to Apex messing up even more


Supers in the front, normals in the rear. Don't think that was mentioned. (Well, Ven contradicted me.)
#11 - JJ72
Need some advice
I've a training layout for myself and I've been running on it this coupe of days, after the lesson I trained a bit more and I feel I have gained quite a lot in terms of consistency.

I wanna attach two replay and see if you can point out some bad habits and rooms for improvement.

The FZ5 one was done before the lesson and is a bit messy, however two laps put together should show my basic approach to the layout.

The GTT one was done right after the lesson, some mistakes as well but should be good enough for analysis.

My main problem is the rear tires gets red hot after 1 1/2 laps and at that stage grip is lost big time, I didn't drift in really big angles with power down so it this normal that drifters have to live with?
Attached files
[RTDC]JJ72_AU1_XRT_FINISHED_2.spr - 80.1 KB - 141 views
[RG]JJ72_AU1_FZ5_6.spr - 62.6 KB - 151 views
i haven't checked your replays, but yes, tires get hot very quickly, especially if you're using supers. in later lessons sam will be instructing how to drift conservatively.

Technique and Setup Questions
(12 posts, started )
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